Contact improvisation

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Contact Improvisation by Thomas Kaltenbrunner. Books about contact improvisation are hard to find and it is even more difficult to find books containing specific exercises, instructions and ideas on how to lead a Contact Improvisation workshop.

Each Contact-teacher has his or her own area of interest--a complete survey has not yet been published in spite of growing public awareness. This book gives practical examples a Books about contact improvisation are hard to find and it is even more difficult to find books containing specific exercises, instructions and ideas on how to lead a Contact Improvisation workshop. This book gives practical examples and ideas which have been tried and tested in the author's own Contact improvisation workshops.

There are a lot of exercises and suggestions to help teach Contact improvisation classes. Get A Copy. Paperbackpages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Contact Improvisationplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Contact Improvisation.Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving….

Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page.

On Teaching Contact Improvisation (2009)

Preview — Contact Improvisation by Cheryl Pallant. In most forms of dancing, performers carry out their steps with a distance that keeps them from colliding with each other. Dancer Steve Paxton in the s considered this distance a territory for investigation. His study of intentional contact resulted in a public performance in in a Soho gallery, and the name "contact improvisation" was coined for the form of unrehe In most forms of dancing, performers carry out their steps with a distance that keeps them from colliding with each other.

His study of intentional contact resulted in a public performance in in a Soho gallery, and the name "contact improvisation" was coined for the form of unrehearsed dance he introduced. Rather than copyrighting it, Paxton allowed it to evolve and spread. In this book the author draws upon her own experience and research to explain the art of contact improvisation, in which dance partners propel movement by physical contact. They roll, fall, spiral, leap, and slip along the contours and momentum of moving bodies.

The text begins with a history, then describes the elements that define this form of dance. Subsequent chapters explore how contact improvisation relates to self and identity; how class, race, gender, culture and physiology influence dance; how dance promotes connection in a culture of isolation; and how it relates to the concept of community.

The final chapter is a collection of exercises explained in the words of teachers from across the United States and abroad. Appendix A describes how to set up and maintain a weekly jam; Appendix B details recommended reading, videos and Web sites. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here. Get A Copy.

Paperbackpages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 1. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Contact Improvisationplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Contact Improvisation. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.Back in for my masters degree. Contact Improvisation is an improvisational dance form that has it roots in the early history of what has come to be known as post-modern dance Banes, S.

The form grew out of a performance score called Magnesiumdeveloped by Steve Paxton in thethat was rooted in an exploration of how two bodies can improvise freely with a shared point of contact.

contact improvisation

Subsequently, he gathered together a group of dancers who worked intensively together before presenting the work again to an audience, this time under the name Contact Improvisations CQ ; p2.

Since then it has grown into postmodern dance genre of its own, attracting enthusiasts from many different fields who practice in many countries worldwide Novack, C. These jams attract a wide range of participants, from those who identify themselves as professional dancers to those whose interest is purely recreational. Many dance educations include contact improvisation to some extent in their curriculum, since the skills it both requires and develops through its practice are regarded as increasingly necessary and beneficial in the preparation of young dancers.

The skills can broadly be described as those alignment, release, partnering, improvisation, and training of the reflexes. The emergence of contact improvisation is credited by some as inspiring and influencing the partnering skills of contemporary dance that emerged from the s DV8, Wim van de Keybus.

Much has been written elsewhere about the history and development of contact improvisation Albright A. This introduction is brief and glosses over much.

Contact improvisation Tamara Maksimenko and Sergei Semichev

The concern of this essay is how contact improvisation is learned and how it is taught. I first came across contact improvisation in I was studying physical theatre and took a weekend workshop with Laurie Booth. I was instantly hooked and sought out learning opportunities with as many teachers as I could find. I practised the form at contact improvisation jams. InI was lucky enough to study contact improvisation for a month with Steve Paxton who originated the form.

These days he rarely teaches the form itself, but rather a body of work sourced from contact improvisation that he calls Material For The Spine Paxton, S. And I also count myself lucky to have studied regularly sinceand later collaborated, corresponded and dialogued with, Nancy Stark Smith Koteen, D.

She was the person who first suggested I teach the form and for this I am immensely grateful since it provided me with my first impetus to teach any form of movement.

Her advice was that if I wanted to get better at dancing contact improvisation then I should teach it, and teach it to beginners. I did, it worked, and since engaging in this process, all my teaching has been oriented around this idea that through teaching others I facilitate my own learning. My interest in the form has changed considerably over the years. Helsinki has an exceptionally large and committed community of contact improvisation dancers. To some extend I see a similar pattern of changing interest in them as I have traced in myself.

Broadly speaking in the early years of dancing the form I was more oriented towards developing the skills technical and sensory, although as I emphasise later they are inseparable in order to become comfortable dancing at any level or speed.

During this period I was quite choosy about partners, looking for those whose level of skill I thought matched or exceeded my own. Later on, when those skills were no longer an issue, my interests opened more to issues of improvisation and how to meet another through touch and movement. What follows is based on my reflection on my own process of learning contact improvisation, and of that of my peers, my students and ex-students.Contact Improvisation is an open ended exploration of the kinesthetic possibilities of bodies moving through co ntact.

Sometimes wild and athletic, sometimes quiet and meditative, it is a form open to all bodies, changing from moment to moment and dance to dance, a result of the physicalities of those meeting.

Contact manifests in different ways depending on accidents of physics and the intentions and curiosities of those participating. Originally instigated as a performance experiment, it has evolved and branched out in many directions. Its investigations have become the underpinnings of many of the principles of contemporary concert dance, informing not only how to work with another body, but also informing the investigation of how we use our bodies more fluidly, gracefully, and efficiently, whether with a partner or not.

In this context it also has become a major tool and reference point for dance theater, not only as a technique, but as a source of material for investigating relationship, for both improvised and set work, both physically and dramatically — the metaphors for relationship emerging out of CI are endless.

It has also filtered into and affected other forms of popular social dance. Descriptions of contact are sometimes quite vague. It has also taken contact sometimes into such different directions of explorations that some practitioners might not agree that they are still in the same practice. For a description of the root techniques and practices of contact improvisation… something of a condensed version of some of the early classic explorations of contact improvisation, goto Fundamentals of Contact Improvisation.

Approaching Contact Improvisation as a potentially profound and fulfilling opportunity for self-study — physically, emotionally, and aesthetically —Body Research offer in their workshops many roads into the investigations of contact, looking at what is unique to each encounter and what is universal about bodies and physics. The aim is to cultivate greater ease, power, and pleasure in being in a body as well as greater presence in physical inquisitiveness and aesthetic exploration.

For more information on Contact workshops with Karl Frost or on events organized by Body Research, visit the Calendar. Click the link here for a newspaper review of a weekend contact improvisation workshop with Karl Frost in Ventura, California. Montpellier, France Contact is the frame of investigation.

Improvisation is the flow of choice-making and response.Collaboration, creativity, communication, open thinking, and cultural diversity are integral components of my nursing practice. This understanding made me realize that contact improvisation is more than just rolling around on the ground, there are key elements that are learned in contact that will be vital to my future as a nurse.

Not only will these aspects improve my skills in practice, but also in everyday life and with my relationships with others. Contact Improvisation explores physical contact among participants and challenges preconceptions about the gendered body. This comes from centering mind and body, finding humor, sharing weight, movement, and focus on sensations.

Contact Improvisation helps to build skills of trust, receptivity, responsiveness, and preparedness. Luther College dance courses teach Contact Improvisation and incorporate ongoing community jams. Jams are held on Sundays from p. Luther will also be hosting Contact Improvisation Iowa July You can find more information about this event on Blake Nellis' website. There are other CI jams and classes in the surrounding area.

Apply Now Visit Luther. These guidelines help to support a safe and respectful environment for the practice of Contact Improvisation.

You are the architect of your own experience.Body contact improvisation is a form of dance which incorporates elements from sporting movement and gymnastics, yoga, martial arts, philosophies of socio-sexual equality, and modern theatre practices of physical ensemble playing. Its invention is credited to American dancer and choreographer Steve Paxton inalthough contact improvisation's lineage can be traced to his work with Merce Cunningham and the Judson Dance Theatre in the early s.

Contact improvisation stems from the idea that each body is unique. Dance is spontaneously created by the impulsive interaction of two different bodies, regardless of preconditioned reflexes and accepted notions of size, weight and strength. Dance partners sustain physical contact and rely upon mutual trust and support.

It is process, not product, which counts in contact improvisation dance; aesthetically-pleasing results are shunned in favour of an inward-looking spiritual integration of mind and body. As such, it is no surprise that its appeal has spread beyond professional dancers and choreographers. Phil Tushingham, a one-armed dancer, has been promoting contact improvisation with a proselytising zeal for many years. He leads undergraduate courses in the subject at the University of Plymouth where he is the director of Theatre and Performance Studies.

Together with Laura Kearnes, a dancer, he has established weekly workshops inspired by a fascination with the benefits of touching, with special reference to blind and disabled people. The sessions are described on posters as 'a shared experience of movement, where able and disabled bodies meet, move and dance together'.

The workshops I have joined have been attended by both able-bodied and disabled people. They begin with a thorough warm-up which includes shiatsu massage to relax muscles. Most of the preliminary exercises concentrate on developing the spine as the focus for giving and taking weight.

These progress to training exercises in falling and tumbling. It was while rolling across the floor in a banana shape that I decided my rigid body was unsuited to this type of activity.

Contact Improvisation Jams

Only by looking across the mats at Karen, who is paraplegic and merrily unconcerned about appearing 'foolish', did I gain the confidence to attempt the next exercise. I lay on the floor, hurled my leg into the air from the hip and tried to swing my body around in a circle. I was inept but slightly less self-conscious. The last hour of the session is spent doing contact improvisation itself. We begin gently by accepting a partner's full weight while kneeling on all fours and end up by rolling about on the floor in a heap, exploring areas of contact and resistance.

Comparisons have often been made between sex and a contact dance.

contact improvisation

This is because contact improvisation demands the de-particularisation of parts of the body. Dancers, even beginners, must be responsive to the entire body; avoiding socially-taboo genitals and breasts only leads to an inhibited and incomplete experience.

As a tense, non-dancing, large woman, I have been conditioned to believe that my weight cannot be supported and that all touching is primarily sexual. Contact improvisation, for me, is both a frightening and liberating adventure. You can find our Community Guidelines in full here. Want to discuss real-world problems, be involved in the most engaging discussions and hear from the journalists? Start your Independent Premium subscription today.No part of this work may be reproduced - including by photocopy, microfilm or any other means processed, stored electronically, copied or distributed in any form whatsoever without the writter permission of the publisher.

Historical Background 1. Flexible, Lively and Intelligent 2. Exercises and Methods.

Luther College Site Navigation

Taking Weight 2. Contact Improvisation with the Disabled 1. Acknowledgements First of all, many thanks to Nick Procyk for his translation. This book came about after my two-year full time training with Keriac - it was a great time; with teachers such as Scott Wells and Barbara Dilley and innumerable Jams.

It reflects my own experience of Contact Improvisation and my own development as well. I will say a few words about myself to give you the background to the book. I studied Psychology and "Naturheilkunde" in Germany and have worked for many years leading seminars in different aspects of Bodywork, communications training and have been teaching Contact since I have published a couple of books arising from my work.

My motivation to take on this present book came mainly from three different sources: firstly it gave me an opportunity to reflect on my own positive experience within this dance form; secondly, a chance to introduce it to a wider audience and thirdly to strengthen the contact community.

contact improvisation

This book arises out of my personal experience: Material, which I have collected from many different sources, is simply handed on. A special thanks here to Keriac! I have tried to present a broad overview of the wide often unstructured field of Contact Improvisation. Each teacher inherits a certain range of "classic" or "standard" material, opinions about what this is differs of course!

contact improvisation

This leads to great differences between teachers and teaching styles. Making choices means setting limits and each choice is a result of personal experience and judgement. Out of the vast range of exercises to be found in Contact workshops, I chose those which I find personally resonant and useful. I would like to emphasise that this should not be seen as a book based around the individual styles of a few selected teachers.

The detective work needed to find out from which teacher each exercise originated is practically impossible. Special thanks for Nancy Stark Smith for her truly generous support and to all the people who have made their photos available. Maybe my book will inspire others to publish more Cl stuff! Thomas Kaltenbrunner, Kempten, May Two young men in T-shirts and sweat pants, roll and slide on the floor, moving close to each other, in constant bodily contact but without consciously looking in each others eyes.

Even though one is short and slim and the other taller and more heavily built, they move together smoothly and evenly, balanced and flowing, sometimes slower then faster with an apparent effortless lightness. They rise from the floor, circling close to each other in a seemingly random way, one man's shoulder glides down the other's back, head touches head, hips lean against legs and suddenly the big man is lying relaxed on the back of the other.

His weight seems light, the man supporting is relaxed and stable. The man underneath moves slightly to one side, the other one slides slowly to the floor and curls himself up. The slighter of the two now follows and copies this movement and ends up sitting amiably on his partner's shoulder. They roll over each other on the floor.


thoughts on “Contact improvisation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *